Friday, July 16, 2021

Education: Plato and Aristotle’s Philosophy of Education

Introduction

Plato joined Socrates as a student when he was an adolescent of twenty and Socrates was sixty years old. Aristotle at seventeen years presented himself, joining Plato’s group when he was sixty years old. Aristotle possessed a strong character, a penetrating intellect, apparent sincerity, but great personal ambition. Aristotle was a student in the Academy during the twenty years he remained in Athens. His remarkable intellectual powers led Plato to call him the ‘Mind of the School’.

After the death of his teacher, Aristotle soon moved on, to become the tutor of Alexander the Great. After his Persian conquest, Alexander presented his former tutor with a sum equivalent to a million dollars, which enabled Aristotle to purchase a large library and continue his work under the most ideal circumstances. When Aristotle was forty-nine years old he returned to Athens and founded his own school of philosophy. It was known as the Peripatetic School because of Aristotle's habit of strolling up and down the shaded walks around the Lyceum while talking with his pupils.

Plato’s and Aristotle’s Philosophical Concepts

Plato and Aristotle differ in their philosophical concepts and methods. It is even more prominent once we recognize that only about a quarter of his work has been passed down. These seem to be sketchy and obscure notes, which were highly technical and full of repetitions intended for his lecturers. It gives the impression of an immense historic loss that Aristotle failed to continue the line of teaching begun by Pythagoras and clarified by Plato. But Aristotle was not content to be a 'transmitter.' Plato claimed no originality for his ideas, giving the credit to Socrates and Pythagoras.

Definition of Philosophy

It is the task of Philosophy to investigate this all-important question: What is real? At first glance, Aristotle's definition of philosophy seems to agree with Plato's. Plato described philosophy as the science of the Idea, the science which deals with noumena rather than phenomena. Aristotle defined it as the science of the universal essence of that which is real or actual. On the topic of Education, they differ in definition and philosophical concept. Plato’s approach was always that of utilizing questions to get the pupil to understand and come up with an answer by himself whereas Aristotle chose a different approach and stated the answer.

The philosophy of education is the study of the purpose, process, nature and ideals of education. This can be within the context of education as a social institution or more broadly as the process of human existential growth, i.e. how it is that our understanding of the world is continually transformed (be it from facts, social customs, experiences, or even our own emotions).

Definition of Education

Plato in defining education or knowledge, as it was referred, looked at the value of knowledge and defining the term. He questioned: What knowledge and skills are worthwhile learning? What are the goals of education? What is knowledge? How is it different from belief? What is a mistake? A lie? Conversely, Aristotle states that the purpose of the state is to educate the people, to make them virtuous. Virtue is the life principle of the state. The goal of the state is to educate with a view toward its own institutions (to preserve them) - political education of all citizens (Davidson, 1900). Virtue is the perfection of reason. The reason is the source of the first principles of knowledge. Reason deals with the abstract and ideal aspects. Active reason makes the world intelligible ("Aristotle" 384-322 BC). Education is a function of the State and is conducted, primarily at least, for the ends of the State. State - highest social institution which secures the highest goal or happiness of man. Education is preparation for some worthy activity (Davidson, 1900). Education should be guided by legislation to make it correspond with the results of psychological analysis, and follow the gradual development of the bodily and mental faculties ("Aristotle" 384-322 BC).

Philosophy on Education

Plato

Plato was considered to be one of the earliest important educational thinkers. Education plays a minor role in his general philosophical vision; nevertheless, it still is a fundamental area. Education, to him, serves its purpose to the Republic by sustaining it. His selected methods purported for this Republic were excessive. They namely involved: “removing children from their mothers' care and raising them as wards of the state, with great care being taken to differentiate children suitable to the various castes, the highest receiving the most education so that they could act as guardians of the city and care for the less able”.

It was Plato’s belief that the individual was best served by being subordinated to a just society and that talent was distributed non-genetically. This talent must be found in children born to all classes. Plato continued to purport that those correctly gifted are to be educated by the state as to be competent to presume the position of a ruling class. This is viewed as a system of selective public education asserted on the postulation that an educated minority of the population are, by virtue of their education, adequate for healthy governance.

Aristotle

        Based on the limited information passed down about Aristotle’s writings, one of which was a treatise ‘On Education’; we consequently have knowledge of his philosophy of education, for the most part, owing to succinct passages in supplementary works. Aristotle deemed “nature, habit, and reason to be three equally important forces to be cultivated in education. Thus, for example, he considered repetition to be a key tool to develop good habits. Aristotle placed great emphasis on balancing the theoretical and practical aspects of subjects taught. Subjects he explicitly mentions as being important included reading, writing, and mathematics; music; physical education; literature and history; and a wide range of sciences. He also mentioned the importance of play”.

Philosophical Assessment of Plato vs. Aristotle

Plato and Aristotle both agreed and disagreed on various elements of the philosophy of education. They both are of the same mind that the state played an integral role in the education of its people. However, Plato advocated for strict and stringent methods to be used in getting young children educated, which involved separating them from their families. Aristotle, on the other hand, did not purport these views.

One of education's primary missions for Aristotle, perhaps its most important, was to produce good and virtuous citizens for the polis. He stated that “all who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth”. Plato and Aristotle both differed in the learning techniques and methods employed to teach their pupils. Plato’s emphasis was on questioning his listeners to bring out their own ideas. Contrastingly, Aristotle believed that the teacher was to lead the student systematically.

It is my belief that Plato’s methods would not be suited to today’s cultural, social, and political climate. The way people are today is in severe contrast to what existed several hundred years ago. With such a democratic approach in the ‘West’, Aristotle’s approach may be best suited in some of its elements to today’s world. One of our aims is to produce good and virtuous citizens for society, as purported by Aristotle. To achieve this goal we could never uphold the belief that in order to properly educate our youths we must steal them away, and separate them from their parents so that they will one day take over the ruling class. What foundation would they have from family, history, and love? In addition, the unfolding animosity and hatred that would exist between the ruling government and the people; there would almost certainly be anarchy.

 

 


References

(1996). "Aristotle (384-322 BC)." The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (On-line). Retrieved on September 23, 2006 from http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/a/aristotl.htm

(1996). "Plato (c. 427-347 B.C.E)." The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (On-line). Retrieved on September 23, 2006 from http://www.iep.utm.edu/p/plato.htm 

Robert, A., Brumbaugh, S., (1987)."Plato's ldeal Curriculum and Contemporary Philosophy of Education" Educational Theory Spring 1987, vol 37, no 2.

Stumpf, B., (1988). Socrates to Sartre: A History of Philosophy, New York,.

Barnes, J., (1995). The Cambridge companion to Aristotle. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

Davidson, T., (1900). Aristotle and the ancient education ideals. New York: Charles Scribner's.

http://www.wisdomworld.org/additional/ancientlandmarks/PlatoAndAristotle.html

Ornstein, A., & Levine, D., (1981). An introduction to the foundations of education (2nd Ed.) (pp. 112-113). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Veath, H., (1974). Aristotle. (pp. 94-95). Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP.





*****

About the writer:
Poetess Denise N. Fyffe is a published author of over 30 books, for more than ten years and enjoys Training, Publishing and Counseling. 

Check out her book The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate


This handbook highlights the most efficient teaching techniques to motivate students. The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate Students initially examines who is an expert teacher and how to become one. Then it will delve into how to get students to learn any subject by implementing effective motivation strategies.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.

 



Copyright © 2021, Denise N. Fyffe

Monday, July 12, 2021

Career Development: How to Deal with Dysfunctional Teams


Unfortunately, there is a bit of dysfunction in every team. People are not perfect. They make mistakes and are flawed.

This is true in every arena; from the sporting arena to boardrooms, and from five-star restaurants to large corporations. Imperfect people exist in education, retail, politics, and medicine.

Dysfunctional Teams

It is a commonality for there to be confusion, on every level, rather than none. Nonetheless, dealing with the resulting disorganization and concentrating on collaboration in teams is especially integral at the highest levels of any company.

Why? Because change must begin and come from the top to be lasting and impactful. It determines how all workers will collaborate.

One of the most successful men in the business said that anyone who could get all their employees to collaborate and consistently work together on a common objective could accomplish anything. They would constantly be at the top of their game for they have harnessed the full potential of teamwork.

Good leaders understand and recognize this concept.

Aspiring leaders recognize the truth in this statement, are excited by it. However, they become somber and thoughtful once they understand how challenging it is to accomplish this feat.

But where there is a will, there is a way, thankfully.

It is possible to manage and improve dysfunctional teams, once the symptoms, and cause is identified. Be mindful, that this takes consistent effort and follow through. It requires focus, drive, and mettle, which is an arduous task for most teams.

Dealing with Dysfunctions

There are a few questions one must keep in mind before starting the process of improving teams, and to fully grasp all aspects of the dysfunction. These include:

  • Are team members allowed to and opt to divulge their views freely and easily?
  • Are the group meetings exciting and constructive or are they mechanical and superficial?
  • Are teams collaborating when it comes to decision-making or excluded from the process?
  • Are determinations prompt and not being hindered by unanimity?
  • Are employees dealing with each other’s inadequacies or left to shoulder added responsibilities not equally shared?
  • Are workers forfeiting individual pursuits for the benefit of the team?
  • Are team members encouraged, elevated, and supported or are they exploited and overworked?

Every team, every department, and every company experience difficulty with some of these issues. However, the best of the best is driven to improve, guarantee and safeguard against them being repeated, in the future.

If you readily recognize the existence of some of these dysfunctions in your team, it’s time for remedial action.

To start the process of cutting out bureaucracy, roadblocks, negligence, and disarray in teams, there must first be an awareness of the five dysfunctions. Then, each should be focused on individually.

Identifying the Issues

  1. Lack of Trust – this results when issues are left to fester and resolutions are not forthcoming. Employees avoid being open, admit their weaknesses or ask for assistance. Distrust tends to proliferate in such working environments.
  2. Dreading Disagreements - distrustful employees cannot engage in open, free, enthusiastic conversations on important matters, triggering circumstances where group disagreements can undoubtedly change into covert conversations then off-air criticisms. Working environments where this exists produce substandard determinations.
  3. Absence of Dedication – a team devoid of disagreements finds it challenging to dedicate to determinations or directives. It causes workers to become frustrated, especially those who are high performers.
  4. Dodging of Responsibility – employees who do not dedicate themselves to an applied strategy, impact team members around them, negatively. The continued shirking of responsibilities, and not sharing in group tasks, leads to even the most supportive of workers becoming reluctant to participate, eventually. Ultimately, the behavior is considered the norm and overlooked, even if it erodes the underpinnings of the team.
  5. Overlooking Outcomes - Employees instinctively deal with their ambitions first. For the sake of individuality, ambition, recognition, and advancement. This tends to come above shared group goals, especially if not held responsible.

The Benefits

Working towards establishing a purposeful, unified team is a rare enduring viable benefit accessible to every business that is seeking to stand out and stand above its competitors.

Effective employees within collaborative teams use their time wisely. Effective teams manage issues that arise when they arise and do not leave them to proliferate. Effective managers bring employees together, support their shared ideals and enhance the working environment.

Managing effectively produces superior outcomes, a reduction in issues, quicker turnaround in accomplishing objectives, and minimal anxiety and dissatisfaction for the team.

Furthermore, a unified work environment encourages employees to endure, not resign.

Achieving effective teams is not about controlling confidential, complicated concepts; instead, it pertains to incorporating practicality in conjunction with exceptional and diligent discipline. Oddly, teams thrive because of people; People who aim to improve their imperfections. People who identify their mistakes and flaws and fix them.

Cohesive and successful teams are not a thing of mystery.

 

 

*****

About the writer: Poetess Denise N. Fyffe is a published author of over 30 books, for more than ten years and enjoys Training, Publishing, and Counseling. 

Check out her book The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate

This handbook highlights the most efficient teaching techniques to motivate students. The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate Students initially examines who is an expert teacher and how to become one. Then it will delve into how to get students to learn any subject by implementing effective motivation strategies.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.

 

Copyright © 2021 · All Rights Reserved · Denise N. Fyffe

Saturday, July 10, 2021

Career Development: How to Use Holistic Approaches to Manage Workplace Stress



Holistic Approaches for Stress Management

Having a baby, a flat tire, moving to a new neighborhood, a new job; are all examples of stress. According to the Oxford dictionary (1996), stress is pressure or tensions. It can also be defined as any demand placed on a person that requires a response.

Not all stress is bad; some stress is normal, necessary, and unavoidable.

Hans Selye, a Canadian endocrinologist and founder of modern stress research, states that stress acts as a motivator to make us adjust our behavior to meet changing demands. Selye termed unpleasant stress as distress and pleasant stress as eustress (Garrison and Bly, 1997).

People apply different techniques to cope with stress, whether through relaxation, exercising, modifying one’s thoughts, or improving eating habits.

These techniques can be made more effective if one changes their attitude and become more prepared to deal with pressure or tension. Institutions and organizations are affected by the negative consequences of stress, and some have implemented stress management programs to assist their employees to cope with problems.

The registry of a tertiary institution that caters to hundreds of students would be an ideal location for high counts of stress factors. In order to maintain the performance and effectiveness of this unit, they would have to implement stress management initiatives.

Holistic Approach: Relaxation

Relaxation is the key to any meaningful stress reduction. During stress, muscles tense up, blood pressure increases, heart and respiratory rates go up and energy is more available (Sdorow, 1995).

Relaxation helps to offset these reactions. There are many ways one can unwind, taking some alone time from the pressures of work, is very common. One sub-Technique of relaxation is doing breathing exercises. Taking slow, deep, and rhythmic breaths will slow the heart and respiratory pace.

Other relaxation techniques can be used at work to control physical responses to stress.

Namely, tensing and relaxing muscle groups, whether by clenching and relaxing the fist or clenching and releasing the teeth. Also, meditation, which is another popular approach, is used in combination with yoga.

Clearing our thoughts helps us to reflect on the cause of our stress and decide how we will deal with the problem.

Holistic Approach: Modifying Thoughts

Modifying one’s thoughts is the truest way to control our circumstances. Identifying the things we have control over and those we do not have control over helps in times of stress.

An earthquake, corporate buyouts, tax audits, co-workers’ attitudes are just examples of things we cannot control. However, preparing for an earthquake or any other experience deserves more focus and will ease stress in the long run.

Holistic Approach: Exercise

A popular method of coping with stress is exercise. Exercise rids the body of excess adrenaline and blood sugars that accompany stress.

Any form of physical activity helps one to cope with the physical effects of stress. Activities can range from walking, riding a bike, playing football, or netball. Going to the gym has become a sub-culture in our society.

Millions of dollars are spent yearly on aerobics classes and the latest exercise fad classes. Newly invented exercise machines, such as Bowflex and total gym flood the market almost daily. Large corporations and organizations have developed sporting facilities for their employees and encourage inter-business sporting activities.

These practices, to deal with stress, are very popular. Also, companies experience higher productivity rates and employee relationships are much better.

Conclusion

Stress can be experienced in any circumstances; we each apply different methods to cope.

Techniques such as relaxation, which incorporates breathing exercises, meditation, or simply having some alone time; or exercising, can decrease the effects of stress. These effects can take the form of high blood pressure or muscle tension.

Organizations have established methods to aid employees in dealing with the pressures of work.

Workplace stress is very costly, by reducing stressful policies and providing sporting complexes; productivity rates increases.

 

 

*****

About the writer:
Poetess Denise N. Fyffe is a published author of over 30 books, for more than ten years and enjoys Training, Publishing and Counseling. 

Check out her book The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate


This handbook highlights the most efficient teaching techniques to motivate students. The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate Students initially examines who is an expert teacher and how to become one. Then it will delve into how to get students to learn any subject by implementing effective motivation strategies.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.

 



Copyright © 2021, Denise N. Fyffe

Thursday, July 8, 2021

Career Development: How to Identify the Factors Contributing to Stress at Work



The Factors Contributing to Stress in the Workplace

Stress takes shape in two main forms, everyday stressors, and catastrophic stressors. The stress experienced in the workplace can belong to either of these categories.

Everyday stressors can further be sub-divided into life events and daily hassles (Garrison and Bly, 1997). A change in working hours, trouble with the in-laws, trouble with the boss, too many tasks to complete and not enough time to do it, misplacing or losing things; are all daily hassles.

However, life events have a greater effect on us. Examples of this are sexual difficulties, loss of a job, retirement, death of a spouse natural disasters, and personal injury or loss (Sdorow, 1995).

Scenario: Factors Contributing to Stress at Work

Caroline is working a job from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. being the supervisor, she works two more hours than her subordinates. Every Monday Caroline has to report on the progress in her department and new responsibilities are handed out.

For the past several months, five employees in her section have taken sick leave and her secretary is on maternity leave.

Caroline’s new assistant is not efficient, so she ends up doing most of the administrative. Because of the lack of human resources, it now takes double the time to achieve a departmental goal.

Caroline is also experiencing problems at home.

This single mother has to pick up her 12-year-old daughter from school each evening. Her 3-year-old son is taken care of by a babysitter until she gets home. Caroline’s mother died a month earlier and she’s being divorced.

She does not sleep until 11p.m. at night and she rises at 4 a.m. to prepare her kids for school and cook breakfast. Caroline is on the verge of burnout.

Analyze: Factors Contributing to Stress at Work

The conditions that are affecting Caroline are numerous. They are both everyday stressors and life events.

Daily hassles greet her both at home and at work, and she does not get the time to de-stress. Not only does she not have time to complete her tasks at work, but she also has many responsibilities and inadequate resources.

These conditions alone would cause her to suffer from high blood pressure and frequent headaches.

The employee supervisor relationship between Caroline and her co-workers is also affected. She frequently makes impossible demands and refers to them in demeaning tones.

Caroline has unknowingly created more stress in her workplace.

Caroline is a prime candidate for the detrimental effects of stress. As a lone mother, she has to raise her pre-puberty teenage daughter, while catering to the needs of her young son.

Also, Caroline has not grieved the loss of her mother, who was her main emotional support.

This leaves her susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder. This is a syndrome with physiological and physical symptoms that appears as a delayed response after exposure to an extremely emotionally distressing event.

This disease will increase the risk of her having a physical illness; such as cancer or heart disease.

Conclusion

We all experience stress in our daily lives, whether by daily hassles, life events, or natural disasters. The experience of stress is not limited to home, but can also be at work. Daily hassles may include, carrying your children to school, losing the car keys, having a flat tire, or not meeting a deadline at work.

Life events may take the form of a divorce, the death of a spouse, a life-threatening illness, or the loss of a job. There is one main stress factor that man has no control of, this is a natural disaster; such as volcano eruptions, flooding, fires, tsunamis, and tornadoes.

Workplace stress is different or special because of the amount of time spent there.

The stress factors experienced at work may include overload, time pressure, organizational change, technology, career challenges, and conflict. With these conditions, one may experience burnout, where you are physically and emotionally exhausted.

One may lose concern for safety and overindulge in drugs and alcohol. Other effects are a loss of concentration, making hasty decisions, and a loss of concern for one’s career (Garrain and Bly, 1997)

The conditions that lead to stress would lessen if we prepare ourselves to deal with the factors we can control and not overreact to the ones we have no power over.

*****

About the writer: Poetess Denise N. Fyffe is a published author of over 30 books, for more than ten years and enjoys Training, Publishing, and Counseling. 

Check out her book The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate

This handbook highlights the most efficient teaching techniques to motivate students. The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate Students initially examines who is an expert teacher and how to become one. Then it will delve into how to get students to learn any subject by implementing effective motivation strategies.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.







Copyright © 2021, Denise N. Fyffe

Tuesday, July 6, 2021

Career Development: The Impact of Stress on Work Productivity


Identifying Stress Symptoms and Their Impact on Work Productivity

Individuals react to stress differently, but each person begins with the same physiological response. Stress responses place a lot of demand on the body and mind.

The extreme stress response can be deadly, as the result may take the form of chronic disease; such as heart disease and cancer (Garrain and Bly, 1997).

Stress is commonplace in both our work and home lives; an understanding of the symptoms can be helpful. Selye identified three stages of stress and without intervention, an individual will pass through each.

The first stage is Alarm.

In this stage, the heart rate increases, breathing rate increases, digestion slows and blood pressure goes up. These changes are a result of the release of adrenaline.

The immune system is also suppressed when other hormones are released and clotting agents begin to increase in the blood. These are not noticeable symptoms, however; if they persist the outcome may be deadly.

It is not uncommon for workers to experience heart attacks while at their jobs.

Persons who work in high-stress jobs must utilize effective coping mechanisms, to ensure their survival. Registrars, police personnel, and doctors are just examples of professionals with high-stress jobs. If these individuals suffer from any of the effects of this stage of stress, the number of policemen and doctors will definitely decrease.

As with any organization, the well-being of your employee affects productivity.

So if more registry personnel, doctors, and policemen become ill, the registry will be non-productive and student complaints will increase. In the case of the doctors, more patients will not receive prompt treatment. More patients may die and the fear stigma that is attached to hospitals will definitely hamper patients from receiving treatment at medical facilities.

Resistance is the second stage of stress as identified by Selyes.

In this stage, ‘counter’ hormones decrease the heart rate and the body remains on alert. Long-term effects of resistance include backaches, headaches, high blood pressure, and ulcers.

These symptoms will adversely affect productivity.

We can refer to the registry scenario, for example, the registrar may suffer from increasing manifestations of headaches during student examination and registration period. Her focus is drawn to the discomfort and there is an inability to operate effectively.

In addition, because of the situation, she might desire to go on leave or take sick days. Again, the job suffers. There have been suggestions that cancer may be linked to prolonged stress (Garrain and Bly, 1997).

After prolonged stress the body losses the initial resilience it had.

This stage is known as the Exhaustion stage. Eventually, the body’s defenses are worn down, due to the cycle of alarm and resistance.

At this stage, the immune system is fully depressed and diseases like cancer, alcoholism, and heart disease take over.

Burnout, however, is common in this stage.

When an employee experiences psychological and physical exhaustion of the ability to cope with stress; he or she may experience a productivity level of zero.

Stress-related illnesses cost more to treat than do other work-related illnesses.

The costs for health insurance of benefit programs would most likely be high. If an organization were greatly affected by the effects of stress, then the results would be evident. Fewer employees present at work, less human resources will be deployed to resolve issues, are just examples of what happens.

Most importantly, the morale and relationship between co-workers would be ‘sour’ and ‘breed’ conflict and a lack of professionalism. Companies must utilize and implement stress management programs to maintain productivity and employee satisfaction.

Sources:

  1. Sdorow, L. M., (1993). Psychology (2nd Edition), Brown & Benchmark Publishers
  2. Garrain, M., Bly, M. Human Relations: Productive Approaches for the Workplace. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1997.

 

*****

About the writer:
Poetess Denise N. Fyffe is a published author of over 30 books, for more than ten years and enjoys Training, Publishing, and Counseling. 

Check out her book The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate


This handbook highlights the most efficient teaching techniques to motivate students. The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate Students initially examines who is an expert teacher and how to become one. Then it will delve into how to get students to learn any subject by implementing effective motivation strategies.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.

 

 

 

Copyright © 2021, Denise N. Fyffe

Friday, July 2, 2021

Education: The Fundamentals of Communication


According to Oxford (1996), communication means the “science and practice of transmitting information”.

Communication may be transferred in the form of a phone call, letter, announcement, memo, email, gesture, smile, nod, etc. In other words, it may be verbal or nonverbal. The information sent should be understood by both the sender and the receiver in order to be effective.

The Stages in the Communication Process

There are different stages to communication and a course of action is taken, thus making communication a process.

First, there is an individual, the sender, who relays some knowledge, news, or question. Secondly, he or she will select a medium to send the message to another individual. The person who receives this information is the receiver. In the event that the recipient of this information is not able to comprehend the message, he or she should seek clarification and relay to the sender any misunderstandings.

The receiver will now take on the role of the sender and respond to the message that was sent. The receiver will figure out the message, formulate a response, and select a way to transfer the response to the sender.

Diagram A. clearly lays out the steps or stages in the communication process.

Diagram A - The Fundamentals of Communication by Denise N Fyffe

Issues That May Occur in the Communication Process

The Communication process may be hampered by unforeseen problems. These problems can occur at any point in the communication cycle and produce unwanted results. Some of these problems may present themselves as time being wasted and expenses being incurred unnecessarily. Situations like this can arise from the selection of an inappropriate mode of communication, or by the way, the message was encoded.

To prevent such an issue the sender should ensure the language or vocabulary used can be decoded or understood by the receiver.

For example, a construction manager chooses a letter, to communicate to a delinquent construction worker. The construction worker does not know the meaning of the words that are used by the manager. The message is not understood therefore the behavior continues and the manager will know to have to use another medium to communicate to the worker. Thus, time and resources are wasted.

The manager could have chosen to speak to the worker's face to face; saving time and further complication of the issue.

Another issue that may arise could result from the receiver’s interpretation of the message. He or she may apply the incorrect meaning to the message, thus affecting the outgoing message or response. The receiver must, in this case, seek clarification from the sender and ensure that both of them “have a mutual agreement of the information sent and what it means”(Lecturer notes, September 30, 2004).

Using the case of the manager and the construction worker, the response might have been different if the worker understood the message being sent. However, he could have sought clarification on the issue. This would ensure that he understood what the manager required of him.




*****

About the writer:
Poetess Denise N. Fyffe is a published author of over 30 books, for more than ten years and enjoys Training, Publishing, and Counseling. 

Check out her book The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate


This handbook highlights the most efficient teaching techniques to motivate students. The Expert Teacher’s Guide on How to Motivate Students initially examines who is an expert teacher and how to become one. Then it will delve into how to get students to learn any subject by implementing effective motivation strategies.

Available at all online book retailers and Amazon.com.






Copyright © 2021, Denise N. Fyffe

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